MySQL 5.0 Feature Crave

Right now, I’m craving the INFORMATION_SCHEMA database. Specifically, to compare tables for similarity. Sure, I can diff the results from SHOW CREATE TABLE, or mysqldump, but having the INFORMATION_SCHEMA will be much more handy.

Sigh.

Right now, I’m craving the INFORMATION_SCHEMA database. Specifically, to compare tables for similarity. Sure, I can diff the results from SHOW CREATE TABLE, or mysqldump, but having the INFORMATION_SCHEMA will be much more handy.

Sigh.

Aliases

How much time do you spend every week typing in ‘mysqladmin -u root -p showprocesslist’ ? or ‘mysqladmin -u root -p kill 123,456,789 ? After listening to Tom Limoncelli‘s video presentation of a workshop called “Time Management for System Administrators” (which was the forerunner to the O’Reilly book of the same name), I realized that I could implement some of his tips right away.

Specifically, aliasing. I’ve now aliased the following in my .bash_profile:

alias myps=’mysqladmin -u root -p processlist’
alias mystatus=’mysql -u root -p -e “show status; status;”‘
alias mykill=’mysqladmin -u root -p kill’
alias mysqlr=’mysql -u root -p’

I’d rather not put passwords into my profile, and this makes for easy copying. I use CVS instead of copying to track and easily update changes to my .bash_profile. But I realized while watching the recording that there are many commands, particularly relating to mysql, where I end up typing a lot for the same command over and over.

How much time do you spend every week typing in ‘mysqladmin -u root -p showprocesslist’ ? or ‘mysqladmin -u root -p kill 123,456,789 ? After listening to Tom Limoncelli‘s video presentation of a workshop called “Time Management for System Administrators” (which was the forerunner to the O’Reilly book of the same name), I realized that I could implement some of his tips right away.

Specifically, aliasing. I’ve now aliased the following in my .bash_profile:

alias myps=’mysqladmin -u root -p processlist’
alias mystatus=’mysql -u root -p -e “show status; status;”‘
alias mykill=’mysqladmin -u root -p kill’
alias mysqlr=’mysql -u root -p’

I’d rather not put passwords into my profile, and this makes for easy copying. I use CVS instead of copying to track and easily update changes to my .bash_profile. But I realized while watching the recording that there are many commands, particularly relating to mysql, where I end up typing a lot for the same command over and over.

Wouldn’t You Know It?

So, yesterday, just one day after writing a short article about ENUM and SET and having it pointed out to me that data does not have a place in data structures (which is absolutely correct!), what did a developer want me to do at work but change an existing ENUM to add one item?

Well, having learned a bit, I suggested an alternative. The performance of our site depends on using ENUMs in the way I described, so we must continue to use them. Additionally, I was listening to Robin Schumacher making comments about how some folks “over-normalize” their data and need to do too many JOINs as a result.

Technically speaking, it’s not possible to “over-normalize” a data structure. But I’ll let that slide, because I know exactly what he meant.

At any rate, the alternative I suggested was to add all possible data points, not just the one, to the ENUM, thereby saving future ALTER TABLEs.

So a thank you to Kolbe, Beat and Arjen. I also would like to let people know that I am not perfect, and will attempt to understand mistakes I’ve made gracefully. I’m not perfect, that’s for sure, so do feel free to point out where I’m not correct.

So, yesterday, just one day after writing a short article about ENUM and SET and having it pointed out to me that data does not have a place in data structures (which is absolutely correct!), what did a developer want me to do at work but change an existing ENUM to add one item?

Well, having learned a bit, I suggested an alternative. The performance of our site depends on using ENUMs in the way I described, so we must continue to use them. Additionally, I was listening to Robin Schumacher making comments about how some folks “over-normalize” their data and need to do too many JOINs as a result.

Technically speaking, it’s not possible to “over-normalize” a data structure. But I’ll let that slide, because I know exactly what he meant.

At any rate, the alternative I suggested was to add all possible data points, not just the one, to the ENUM, thereby saving future ALTER TABLEs.

So a thank you to Kolbe, Beat and Arjen. I also would like to let people know that I am not perfect, and will attempt to understand mistakes I’ve made gracefully. I’m not perfect, that’s for sure, so do feel free to point out where I’m not correct.

Working Smarter, Not Harder (SET and ENUM)

So, in a previous post I talked about smart code. Today I put myself square into a discussion about ENUM and SET. ENUM is an enumerated list of values; similar to a pull-down menu, where the only values allowed in that field are the ones defined, with the option of also having a null column.

The ENUM field takes the idea of normalizing the data and eliminates the need for a join on that data. It also makes data integrity easy — if the value you’re trying to enter is not in the ENUM column definition, MySQL throws an error.

ENUM is not a standard SQL data type. It is MySQL specific.

As an example, in the real world I run a database for an international not-for-profit. Whenever a donation comes in, it is associated with some form of solicitation — either “October 2005 mailing” or “website donation” or “2005 Los Angeles House Party”, etc.

To normalize this data in a pure relational database, we’d have to have a separate table, with 2 fields — an ID, and the name of the solitication. We would add to this table whenever we have an event, or do a mailing. In the “donation” table, we would reference the solicitation via the solicitation ID, and set up referential integrity so that an ID that does not exist could not be entered into the table.

Instead, we take advantage of MySQL’s ENUM column type. I have a script that will alter the table when we need to add a new solicitation, so even non-technical folk can do it (they go to a web page, add the name of the field, and click “submit”). Pull-down menus are also not difficult with a similar script to get all the possible values in the ENUM column.

The reason ENUM is a great field is that it stores all the row values in 2 bytes; there is a limit of 65,535 elements in the ENUM column. This uses a lot less space than the hack of just having a char or varchar field, which is what folks usually do when they do not want to add a join to a query by having another table.

Only one value at a time can be stored in an ENUM field; if you want to store more than one value in a column (which makes your database not relational, by the way), you can use the SET datatype.

One example of where I use the SET datatype in the not-for-profit database is for a person’s role in the organization. For instance, a person can be a donor and a volunteer; or a major donor and have grantwriting skills and be a staff member. Or they can be none of these.

Because of the combinations that can be made, SET is limited to 64 values. Each value is stored in a maximum of 8 bytes — not impressive for one value, but rather small when it could be holding up to 64 values. This is more than enough for an application that needs “roles within a not-for-profit organization,” but not necessarily enough for an application that needs “albums in a photo database.”

Most folks will either normalize their data and have a separate table, or make their own SET field by using a text field and matching. The latter has the benefit of utilizing the relevance of a FULLTEXT search, however, the tables are likely larger because they need to store all the text. And there is no data integrity; values can be spelled wrong.

It would be great if there were a LARGE SET value; although it may well be that the computation of joining is faster than querying a table with a large field (if LARGE SET had a limit of 128 items, instead of SET’s 64, it would be stored in 16 bytes, which is pretty large if most rows only have 1 or 2 values).

I’d be interested to know where folks are using SET and ENUM, and where they are deliberately not using them.

So, in a previous post I talked about smart code. Today I put myself square into a discussion about ENUM and SET. ENUM is an enumerated list of values; similar to a pull-down menu, where the only values allowed in that field are the ones defined, with the option of also having a null column.
Continue reading “Working Smarter, Not Harder (SET and ENUM)”

MySQL Print Magazine?

So, I have not been able to find a MySQL magazine in print. Why is that? We’ve got great blogs out there, you might argue, and http://www.planetmysql.org is practically its own magazine, though not in print.

Still, it seems like it would be worth the effort. Thoughts? (http://mysql-journal.com does not seem to be working for me)

So, I have not been able to find a MySQL magazine in print. Why is that? We’ve got great blogs out there, you might argue, and http://www.planetmysql.org is practically its own magazine, though not in print.

Still, it seems like it would be worth the effort. Thoughts? (http://mysql-journal.com does not seem to be working for me)

Smart code

So, the other day I was asked by a developer to come up with a table to tally votes. Basically, there are 6 choices, and customers can vote once per day. I asked if there were any other constraints, and there were none. I specifically asked if they wanted once per calendar date, or ‘it has to be 24 hours since the last vote’; they wanted ‘once per calendar date’. And updating the current day’s vote is not allowed. Once the vote is in, it cannot be changed.

So I came up with a simple table:

CREATE TABLE `ManOfMonth` (
`uid` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL default ‘0’,
`voteDate` date NOT NULL default ‘0000-00-00’,
`uidVoteFor` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL default ‘0’,
PRIMARY KEY (`uid`,`voteDate`),
KEY `countVotes` (`uidVoteFor`)
)

There’s no need for a timestamp, and you can select now() into the voteDate part, and MySQL truncates the data for you (we’re using 4.1.12).

The smart part of this is that the primary key is the constraint on the database — that is, a userid cannot vote more than once per day. So I told the developer, “When you’re writing the code, don’t bother running a select to see if they’ve already voted; just do the insert query, and check if there ends up being an error for a duplicate key.”

Using the MySQL error messages in this way prevents unnecessary selects. This kind of coding should be common practice; I have a feeling it is not, particularly since I had to explain to the developer why the select was unnecessary. Then again, the developer also had wanted a table with uidVoteFor and the tally as 2 columns. This would be a smaller table, sure, and getting the result would be easy, but then there’s still the accounting for whether or not the person had voted that day. The index on uidVoteFor helps make the tally query faster.

To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
Having used Oracle, DB2, Postgres, Sybase, Informix, and MSSQL, I always enjoyed that MySQL just named everything “MySQL”. Sure, it can get confusing — there’s MySQL the server, MySQL the client, MySQL the database instance. . . .MySQL the flamethrower (the kids love this one). . . .But seriously, the ‘big guys’ have all this complicated jargon for really simple ideas.

MySQL has joined them. Granted, I’d been out of the MySQL world for about a year, and some wonderful things have happened in that year. Even a year ago, the company I worked for wasn’t using the most recent software nor taking advantage of all the features their versions of MySQL did have to offer. But I digress.

I’ve been working on MySQL knowledge, particularly with the free webinars. Today I attended the “MySQL Network and MySQL 5.0” webinar, where I learned that MySQL is packaging (better) software, support, tools, access to developers, and a knowledgebase into what they call “MySQL Network.” I was completely unclear on the concept of MySQL Network from the description, and from the name I figured it would have something to do with technical networking, not business to business networking.

Meanwhile, yesterday I realized that the “Pluggable Storage Engines” in MySQL just mean “you can use different table types, and turn off the ones you don’t want to use.” I was familiar with the concept, but not the buzz-phrase used to describe it.
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
Having used Oracle, DB2, Postgres, Sybase, Informix, and MSSQL, I always enjoyed that MySQL just named everything “MySQL”. Sure, it can get confusing — there’s MySQL the server, MySQL the client, MySQL the database instance. . . .MySQL the flamethrower (the kids love this one). . . .But seriously, the ‘big guys’ have all this complicated jargon for really simple ideas.

MySQL has joined them. Granted, I’d been out of the MySQL world for about a year, and some wonderful things have happened in that year. Even a year ago, the company I worked for wasn’t using the most recent software nor taking advantage of all the features their versions of MySQL did have to offer. But I digress.

I’ve been working on MySQL knowledge, particularly with the free webinars. Today I attended the “MySQL Network and MySQL 5.0” webinar, where I learned that MySQL is packaging (better) software, support, tools, access to developers, and a knowledgebase into what they call “MySQL Network.” I was completely unclear on the concept of MySQL Network from the description, and from the name I figured it would have something to do with technical networking, not business to business networking.

Meanwhile, yesterday I realized that the “Pluggable Storage Engines” in MySQL just mean “you can use different table types, and turn off the ones you don’t want to use.” I was familiar with the concept, but not the buzz-phrase used to describe it.
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
Having used Oracle, DB2, Postgres, Sybase, Informix, and MSSQL, I always enjoyed that MySQL just named everything “MySQL”. Sure, it can get confusing — there’s MySQL the server, MySQL the client, MySQL the database instance. . . .MySQL the flamethrower (the kids love this one). . . .But seriously, the ‘big guys’ have all this complicated jargon for really simple ideas.

MySQL has joined them. Granted, I’d been out of the MySQL world for about a year, and some wonderful things have happened in that year. Even a year ago, the company I worked for wasn’t using the most recent software nor taking advantage of all the features their versions of MySQL did have to offer. But I digress.

I’ve been working on MySQL knowledge, particularly with the free webinars. Today I attended the “MySQL Network and MySQL 5.0” webinar, where I learned that MySQL is packaging (better) software, support, tools, access to developers, and a knowledgebase into what they call “MySQL Network.” I was completely unclear on the concept of MySQL Network from the description, and from the name I figured it would have something to do with technical networking, not business to business networking.

Meanwhile, yesterday I realized that the “Pluggable Storage Engines” in MySQL just mean “you can use different table types, and turn off the ones you don’t want to use.” I was familiar with the concept, but not the buzz-phrase used to describe it.
The first Boston MySQL User Group meeting went swimmingly. About 1/2 the people who RSVP’s yes or maybe showed up, ) got pizza as a thank-you gift.

My boss offered me a ride home, definitely — I’ll just go into work later, and not be tempted by a ride home.

The demographics of the group was really amazing:

about 15% female
those with no experience with any database
those with experience with databases but not MySQL
those who’ve been using MySQL for weeks
those who’ve been using MySQL for months
those who’ve been using MySQL for years
those who are trying to convince their company to switch
about 10% Indian
about 20% other-Asian
(I didn’t notice anyone that was recognizably Hispanic or black)
job titles ranging from developer, dba, all the way up to the vice president and president level
The publishing sector was represented by O’Reilly, Addison-Wesley (which is owned by Pearson, which handles the MySQL Press imprint), and Apress. O’Reilly and Apress solicited authors.

Corrections always welcome, and special thanks to Mike Kruckenberg, and Mark Rubin of MySQL AB.

I cannot wait for next month. . .
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
Having used Oracle, DB2, Postgres, Sybase, Informix, and MSSQL, I always enjoyed that MySQL just named everything “MySQL”. Sure, it can get confusing — there’s MySQL the server, MySQL the client, MySQL the database instance. . . .MySQL the flamethrower (the kids love this one). . . .But seriously, the ‘big guys’ have all this complicated jargon for really simple ideas.

MySQL has joined them. Granted, I’d been out of the MySQL world for about a year, and some wonderful things have happened in that year. Even a year ago, the company I worked for wasn’t using the most recent software nor taking advantage of all the features their versions of MySQL did have to offer. But I digress.

I’ve been working on MySQL knowledge, particularly with the free webinars. Today I attended the “MySQL Network and MySQL 5.0” webinar, where I learned that MySQL is packaging (better) software, support, tools, access to developers, and a knowledgebase into what they call “MySQL Network.” I was completely unclear on the concept of MySQL Network from the description, and from the name I figured it would have something to do with technical networking, not business to business networking.

Meanwhile, yesterday I realized that the “Pluggable Storage Engines” in MySQL just mean “you can use different table types, and turn off the ones you don’t want to use.” I was familiar with the concept, but not the buzz-phrase used to describe it.
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
Having used Oracle, DB2, Postgres, Sybase, Informix, and MSSQL, I always enjoyed that MySQL just named everything “MySQL”. Sure, it can get confusing — there’s MySQL the server, MySQL the client, MySQL the database instance. . . .MySQL the flamethrower (the kids love this one). . . .But seriously, the ‘big guys’ have all this complicated jargon for really simple ideas.

MySQL has joined them. Granted, I’d been out of the MySQL world for about a year, and some wonderful things have happened in that year. Even a year ago, the company I worked for wasn’t using the most recent software nor taking advantage of all the features their versions of MySQL did have to offer. But I digress.

I’ve been working on MySQL knowledge, particularly with the free webinars. Today I attended the “MySQL Network and MySQL 5.0” webinar, where I learned that MySQL is packaging (better) software, support, tools, access to developers, and a knowledgebase into what they call “MySQL Network.” I was completely unclear on the concept of MySQL Network from the description, and from the name I figured it would have something to do with technical networking, not business to business networking.

Meanwhile, yesterday I realized that the “Pluggable Storage Engines” in MySQL just mean “you can use different table types, and turn off the ones you don’t want to use.” I was familiar with the concept, but not the buzz-phrase used to describe it.
The first Boston MySQL User Group meeting went swimmingly. About 1/2 the people who RSVP’s yes or maybe showed up, ) got pizza as a thank-you gift.

My boss offered me a ride home, definitely — I’ll just go into work later, and not be tempted by a ride home.

The demographics of the group was really amazing:

about 15% female
those with no experience with any database
those with experience with databases but not MySQL
those who’ve been using MySQL for weeks
those who’ve been using MySQL for months
those who’ve been using MySQL for years
those who are trying to convince their company to switch
about 10% Indian
about 20% other-Asian
(I didn’t notice anyone that was recognizably Hispanic or black)
job titles ranging from developer, dba, all the way up to the vice president and president level
The publishing sector was represented by O’Reilly, Addison-Wesley (which is owned by Pearson, which handles the MySQL Press imprint), and Apress. O’Reilly and Apress solicited authors.

Corrections always welcome, and special thanks to Mike Kruckenberg, and Mark Rubin of MySQL AB.

I cannot wait for next month. . .
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
Having used Oracle, DB2, Postgres, Sybase, Informix, and MSSQL, I always enjoyed that MySQL just named everything “MySQL”. Sure, it can get confusing — there’s MySQL the server, MySQL the client, MySQL the database instance. . . .MySQL the flamethrower (the kids love this one). . . .But seriously, the ‘big guys’ have all this complicated jargon for really simple ideas.

MySQL has joined them. Granted, I’d been out of the MySQL world for about a year, and some wonderful things have happened in that year. Even a year ago, the company I worked for wasn’t using the most recent software nor taking advantage of all the features their versions of MySQL did have to offer. But I digress.

I’ve been working on MySQL knowledge, particularly with the free webinars. Today I attended the “MySQL Network and MySQL 5.0” webinar, where I learned that MySQL is packaging (better) software, support, tools, access to developers, and a knowledgebase into what they call “MySQL Network.” I was completely unclear on the concept of MySQL Network from the description, and from the name I figured it would have something to do with technical networking, not business to business networking.

Meanwhile, yesterday I realized that the “Pluggable Storage Engines” in MySQL just mean “you can use different table types, and turn off the ones you don’t want to use.” I was familiar with the concept, but not the buzz-phrase used to describe it.
The first Boston MySQL User Group meeting went swimmingly. About 1/2 the people who RSVP’s yes or maybe showed up, ) got pizza as a thank-you gift.

My boss offered me a ride home, definitely — I’ll just go into work later, and not be tempted by a ride home.

The demographics of the group was really amazing:

about 15% female
those with no experience with any database
those with experience with databases but not MySQL
those who’ve been using MySQL for weeks
those who’ve been using MySQL for months
those who’ve been using MySQL for years
those who are trying to convince their company to switch
about 10% Indian
about 20% other-Asian
(I didn’t notice anyone that was recognizably Hispanic or black)
job titles ranging from developer, dba, all the way up to the vice president and president level
The publishing sector was represented by O’Reilly, Addison-Wesley (which is owned by Pearson, which handles the MySQL Press imprint), and Apress. O’Reilly and Apress solicited authors.

Corrections always welcome, and special thanks to Mike Kruckenberg, and Mark Rubin of MySQL AB.

I cannot wait for next month. . .
So I’ve been looking into the Archive Storage Engine. What I would really like to do with it is get data in realtime, they want all the data up until “now”.

It is inadvisable to replicate from one storage engine type to another. I have not yet played with it, but since an Archive table does not allow updates and deletes, replicating from a MyISAM or InnoDB table to an Archive one is a bad idea.

Most folks probably run a batch job; but I wonder if it can be done in real-time. Or rather, ‘what is the best way to run it real-time?’ One way, off the top of my head, is to do this are to replicate to a blackhole table with a trigger, to insert into an archive table whenever an INSERT statement is called. The blackhole table should not give an error upon UPDATE or DELETE statements.

This also allows for easy aggregation, because the trigger can say “update the count and the country of a new profile” instead of having an entire replicated set of data, with reports running “SELECT count(*)”. Instead of copying all the data and running the same reports on a different server/table, we can now collect the data we actually want, which is “1 new paid membership at time t located in Sao Paulo, Brazil.” For reporting, we do not care what the name of the member is.

I have searched around but have not yet found how users are getting data into their archived databases. I need a sandbox server at work so I can play with the options.
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
Having used Oracle, DB2, Postgres, Sybase, Informix, and MSSQL, I always enjoyed that MySQL just named everything “MySQL”. Sure, it can get confusing — there’s MySQL the server, MySQL the client, MySQL the database instance. . . .MySQL the flamethrower (the kids love this one). . . .But seriously, the ‘big guys’ have all this complicated jargon for really simple ideas.

MySQL has joined them. Granted, I’d been out of the MySQL world for about a year, and some wonderful things have happened in that year. Even a year ago, the company I worked for wasn’t using the most recent software nor taking advantage of all the features their versions of MySQL did have to offer. But I digress.

I’ve been working on MySQL knowledge, particularly with the free webinars. Today I attended the “MySQL Network and MySQL 5.0” webinar, where I learned that MySQL is packaging (better) software, support, tools, access to developers, and a knowledgebase into what they call “MySQL Network.” I was completely unclear on the concept of MySQL Network from the description, and from the name I figured it would have something to do with technical networking, not business to business networking.

Meanwhile, yesterday I realized that the “Pluggable Storage Engines” in MySQL just mean “you can use different table types, and turn off the ones you don’t want to use.” I was familiar with the concept, but not the buzz-phrase used to describe it.
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
Having used Oracle, DB2, Postgres, Sybase, Informix, and MSSQL, I always enjoyed that MySQL just named everything “MySQL”. Sure, it can get confusing — there’s MySQL the server, MySQL the client, MySQL the database instance. . . .MySQL the flamethrower (the kids love this one). . . .But seriously, the ‘big guys’ have all this complicated jargon for really simple ideas.

MySQL has joined them. Granted, I’d been out of the MySQL world for about a year, and some wonderful things have happened in that year. Even a year ago, the company I worked for wasn’t using the most recent software nor taking advantage of all the features their versions of MySQL did have to offer. But I digress.

I’ve been working on MySQL knowledge, particularly with the free webinars. Today I attended the “MySQL Network and MySQL 5.0” webinar, where I learned that MySQL is packaging (better) software, support, tools, access to developers, and a knowledgebase into what they call “MySQL Network.” I was completely unclear on the concept of MySQL Network from the description, and from the name I figured it would have something to do with technical networking, not business to business networking.

Meanwhile, yesterday I realized that the “Pluggable Storage Engines” in MySQL just mean “you can use different table types, and turn off the ones you don’t want to use.” I was familiar with the concept, but not the buzz-phrase used to describe it.
The first Boston MySQL User Group meeting went swimmingly. About 1/2 the people who RSVP’s yes or maybe showed up, ) got pizza as a thank-you gift.

My boss offered me a ride home, definitely — I’ll just go into work later, and not be tempted by a ride home.

The demographics of the group was really amazing:

about 15% female
those with no experience with any database
those with experience with databases but not MySQL
those who’ve been using MySQL for weeks
those who’ve been using MySQL for months
those who’ve been using MySQL for years
those who are trying to convince their company to switch
about 10% Indian
about 20% other-Asian
(I didn’t notice anyone that was recognizably Hispanic or black)
job titles ranging from developer, dba, all the way up to the vice president and president level
The publishing sector was represented by O’Reilly, Addison-Wesley (which is owned by Pearson, which handles the MySQL Press imprint), and Apress. O’Reilly and Apress solicited authors.

Corrections always welcome, and special thanks to Mike Kruckenberg, and Mark Rubin of MySQL AB.

I cannot wait for next month. . .
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
Having used Oracle, DB2, Postgres, Sybase, Informix, and MSSQL, I always enjoyed that MySQL just named everything “MySQL”. Sure, it can get confusing — there’s MySQL the server, MySQL the client, MySQL the database instance. . . .MySQL the flamethrower (the kids love this one). . . .But seriously, the ‘big guys’ have all this complicated jargon for really simple ideas.

MySQL has joined them. Granted, I’d been out of the MySQL world for about a year, and some wonderful things have happened in that year. Even a year ago, the company I worked for wasn’t using the most recent software nor taking advantage of all the features their versions of MySQL did have to offer. But I digress.

I’ve been working on MySQL knowledge, particularly with the free webinars. Today I attended the “MySQL Network and MySQL 5.0” webinar, where I learned that MySQL is packaging (better) software, support, tools, access to developers, and a knowledgebase into what they call “MySQL Network.” I was completely unclear on the concept of MySQL Network from the description, and from the name I figured it would have something to do with technical networking, not business to business networking.

Meanwhile, yesterday I realized that the “Pluggable Storage Engines” in MySQL just mean “you can use different table types, and turn off the ones you don’t want to use.” I was familiar with the concept, but not the buzz-phrase used to describe it.
The first Boston MySQL User Group meeting went swimmingly. About 1/2 the people who RSVP’s yes or maybe showed up, ) got pizza as a thank-you gift.

My boss offered me a ride home, definitely — I’ll just go into work later, and not be tempted by a ride home.

The demographics of the group was really amazing:

about 15% female
those with no experience with any database
those with experience with databases but not MySQL
those who’ve been using MySQL for weeks
those who’ve been using MySQL for months
those who’ve been using MySQL for years
those who are trying to convince their company to switch
about 10% Indian
about 20% other-Asian
(I didn’t notice anyone that was recognizably Hispanic or black)
job titles ranging from developer, dba, all the way up to the vice president and president level
The publishing sector was represented by O’Reilly, Addison-Wesley (which is owned by Pearson, which handles the MySQL Press imprint), and Apress. O’Reilly and Apress solicited authors.

Corrections always welcome, and special thanks to Mike Kruckenberg, and Mark Rubin of MySQL AB.

I cannot wait for next month. . .
So I’ve been looking into the Archive Storage Engine. What I would really like to do with it is get data in realtime, they want all the data up until “now”.

It is inadvisable to replicate from one storage engine type to another. I have not yet played with it, but since an Archive table does not allow updates and deletes, replicating from a MyISAM or InnoDB table to an Archive one is a bad idea.

Most folks probably run a batch job; but I wonder if it can be done in real-time. Or rather, ‘what is the best way to run it real-time?’ One way, off the top of my head, is to do this are to replicate to a blackhole table with a trigger, to insert into an archive table whenever an INSERT statement is called. The blackhole table should not give an error upon UPDATE or DELETE statements.

This also allows for easy aggregation, because the trigger can say “update the count and the country of a new profile” instead of having an entire replicated set of data, with reports running “SELECT count(*)”. Instead of copying all the data and running the same reports on a different server/table, we can now collect the data we actually want, which is “1 new paid membership at time t located in Sao Paulo, Brazil.” For reporting, we do not care what the name of the member is.

I have searched around but have not yet found how users are getting data into their archived databases. I need a sandbox server at work so I can play with the options.
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
Having used Oracle, DB2, Postgres, Sybase, Informix, and MSSQL, I always enjoyed that MySQL just named everything “MySQL”. Sure, it can get confusing — there’s MySQL the server, MySQL the client, MySQL the database instance. . . .MySQL the flamethrower (the kids love this one). . . .But seriously, the ‘big guys’ have all this complicated jargon for really simple ideas.

MySQL has joined them. Granted, I’d been out of the MySQL world for about a year, and some wonderful things have happened in that year. Even a year ago, the company I worked for wasn’t using the most recent software nor taking advantage of all the features their versions of MySQL did have to offer. But I digress.

I’ve been working on MySQL knowledge, particularly with the free webinars. Today I attended the “MySQL Network and MySQL 5.0” webinar, where I learned that MySQL is packaging (better) software, support, tools, access to developers, and a knowledgebase into what they call “MySQL Network.” I was completely unclear on the concept of MySQL Network from the description, and from the name I figured it would have something to do with technical networking, not business to business networking.

Meanwhile, yesterday I realized that the “Pluggable Storage Engines” in MySQL just mean “you can use different table types, and turn off the ones you don’t want to use.” I was familiar with the concept, but not the buzz-phrase used to describe it.
The first Boston MySQL User Group meeting went swimmingly. About 1/2 the people who RSVP’s yes or maybe showed up, ) got pizza as a thank-you gift.

My boss offered me a ride home, definitely — I’ll just go into work later, and not be tempted by a ride home.

The demographics of the group was really amazing:

about 15% female
those with no experience with any database
those with experience with databases but not MySQL
those who’ve been using MySQL for weeks
those who’ve been using MySQL for months
those who’ve been using MySQL for years
those who are trying to convince their company to switch
about 10% Indian
about 20% other-Asian
(I didn’t notice anyone that was recognizably Hispanic or black)
job titles ranging from developer, dba, all the way up to the vice president and president level
The publishing sector was represented by O’Reilly, Addison-Wesley (which is owned by Pearson, which handles the MySQL Press imprint), and Apress. O’Reilly and Apress solicited authors.

Corrections always welcome, and special thanks to Mike Kruckenberg, and Mark Rubin of MySQL AB.

I cannot wait for next month. . .
So I’ve been looking into the Archive Storage Engine. What I would really like to do with it is get data in realtime, they want all the data up until “now”.

It is inadvisable to replicate from one storage engine type to another. I have not yet played with it, but since an Archive table does not allow updates and deletes, replicating from a MyISAM or InnoDB table to an Archive one is a bad idea.

Most folks probably run a batch job; but I wonder if it can be done in real-time. Or rather, ‘what is the best way to run it real-time?’ One way, off the top of my head, is to do this are to replicate to a blackhole table with a trigger, to insert into an archive table whenever an INSERT statement is called. The blackhole table should not give an error upon UPDATE or DELETE statements.

This also allows for easy aggregation, because the trigger can say “update the count and the country of a new profile” instead of having an entire replicated set of data, with reports running “SELECT count(*)”. Instead of copying all the data and running the same reports on a different server/table, we can now collect the data we actually want, which is “1 new paid membership at time t located in Sao Paulo, Brazil.” For reporting, we do not care what the name of the member is.

I have searched around but have not yet found how users are getting data into their archived databases. I need a sandbox server at work so I can play with the options.
Why is it that running a monitoring system is such a marketable skill? In every company, having servers up is important. So does everyone have a robust monitoring system? Sure, folks implement scripts, but those are always one-off solutions. And what IS it with folks writing scripts that e-mail them when they’re successful? Just touch a file and have a simple script check to see if the file was touched, that way you know when it failed and do not have to rely on “did I get that e-mail?”

I was lucky to have worked on Nagios while at Tufts, and have set it up everywhere else I’ve worked. I should definitely remember to check up on the plugins site from time to time, so I do not duplicate efforts. Of course, submitting plugins would also eliminate the problem of “I wrote that check at my last company, and now I want it again!” I have not yet come across that, although I did come across a plugin I could have used at my last job, checking data via snmp, that would have been useful, and which I will implement here.

For now, nagios (2.0) is happy. I’ve written checks to find the lag time on replication and the remaining innodb space. Behind the cut is a 50k picture of the nagios server, currently happy.

I also intend to use the reporting feature of nagios to get stats on how available our services are.

Continue reading “Smart code”

Does it get any better than this?

Why is it that running a monitoring system is such a marketable skill? In every company, having servers up is important. So does everyone have a robust monitoring system? Sure, folks implement scripts, but those are always one-off solutions. And what IS it with folks writing scripts that e-mail them when they’re successful? Just touch a file and have a simple script check to see if the file was touched, that way you know when it failed and do not have to rely on “did I get that e-mail?”

I was lucky to have worked on Nagios while at Tufts, and have set it up everywhere else I’ve worked. I should definitely remember to check up on the plugins site from time to time, so I do not duplicate efforts. Of course, submitting plugins would also eliminate the problem of “I wrote that check at my last company, and now I want it again!” I have not yet come across that, although I did come across a plugin I could have used at my last job, checking data via snmp, that would have been useful, and which I will implement here.

For now, nagios (2.0) is happy. I’ve written checks to find the lag time on replication and the remaining innodb space. Behind the cut is a 50k picture of the nagios server, currently happy.

I also intend to use the reporting feature of nagios to get stats on how available our services are.


To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
Having used Oracle, DB2, Postgres, Sybase, Informix, and MSSQL, I always enjoyed that MySQL just named everything “MySQL”. Sure, it can get confusing — there’s MySQL the server, MySQL the client, MySQL the database instance. . . .MySQL the flamethrower (the kids love this one). . . .But seriously, the ‘big guys’ have all this complicated jargon for really simple ideas.

MySQL has joined them. Granted, I’d been out of the MySQL world for about a year, and some wonderful things have happened in that year. Even a year ago, the company I worked for wasn’t using the most recent software nor taking advantage of all the features their versions of MySQL did have to offer. But I digress.

I’ve been working on MySQL knowledge, particularly with the free webinars. Today I attended the “MySQL Network and MySQL 5.0” webinar, where I learned that MySQL is packaging (better) software, support, tools, access to developers, and a knowledgebase into what they call “MySQL Network.” I was completely unclear on the concept of MySQL Network from the description, and from the name I figured it would have something to do with technical networking, not business to business networking.

Meanwhile, yesterday I realized that the “Pluggable Storage Engines” in MySQL just mean “you can use different table types, and turn off the ones you don’t want to use.” I was familiar with the concept, but not the buzz-phrase used to describe it.
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
Having used Oracle, DB2, Postgres, Sybase, Informix, and MSSQL, I always enjoyed that MySQL just named everything “MySQL”. Sure, it can get confusing — there’s MySQL the server, MySQL the client, MySQL the database instance. . . .MySQL the flamethrower (the kids love this one). . . .But seriously, the ‘big guys’ have all this complicated jargon for really simple ideas.

MySQL has joined them. Granted, I’d been out of the MySQL world for about a year, and some wonderful things have happened in that year. Even a year ago, the company I worked for wasn’t using the most recent software nor taking advantage of all the features their versions of MySQL did have to offer. But I digress.

I’ve been working on MySQL knowledge, particularly with the free webinars. Today I attended the “MySQL Network and MySQL 5.0” webinar, where I learned that MySQL is packaging (better) software, support, tools, access to developers, and a knowledgebase into what they call “MySQL Network.” I was completely unclear on the concept of MySQL Network from the description, and from the name I figured it would have something to do with technical networking, not business to business networking.

Meanwhile, yesterday I realized that the “Pluggable Storage Engines” in MySQL just mean “you can use different table types, and turn off the ones you don’t want to use.” I was familiar with the concept, but not the buzz-phrase used to describe it.
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
Having used Oracle, DB2, Postgres, Sybase, Informix, and MSSQL, I always enjoyed that MySQL just named everything “MySQL”. Sure, it can get confusing — there’s MySQL the server, MySQL the client, MySQL the database instance. . . .MySQL the flamethrower (the kids love this one). . . .But seriously, the ‘big guys’ have all this complicated jargon for really simple ideas.

MySQL has joined them. Granted, I’d been out of the MySQL world for about a year, and some wonderful things have happened in that year. Even a year ago, the company I worked for wasn’t using the most recent software nor taking advantage of all the features their versions of MySQL did have to offer. But I digress.

I’ve been working on MySQL knowledge, particularly with the free webinars. Today I attended the “MySQL Network and MySQL 5.0” webinar, where I learned that MySQL is packaging (better) software, support, tools, access to developers, and a knowledgebase into what they call “MySQL Network.” I was completely unclear on the concept of MySQL Network from the description, and from the name I figured it would have something to do with technical networking, not business to business networking.

Meanwhile, yesterday I realized that the “Pluggable Storage Engines” in MySQL just mean “you can use different table types, and turn off the ones you don’t want to use.” I was familiar with the concept, but not the buzz-phrase used to describe it.
The first Boston MySQL User Group meeting went swimmingly. About 1/2 the people who RSVP’s yes or maybe showed up, ) got pizza as a thank-you gift.

My boss offered me a ride home, definitely — I’ll just go into work later, and not be tempted by a ride home.

The demographics of the group was really amazing:

about 15% female
those with no experience with any database
those with experience with databases but not MySQL
those who’ve been using MySQL for weeks
those who’ve been using MySQL for months
those who’ve been using MySQL for years
those who are trying to convince their company to switch
about 10% Indian
about 20% other-Asian
(I didn’t notice anyone that was recognizably Hispanic or black)
job titles ranging from developer, dba, all the way up to the vice president and president level
The publishing sector was represented by O’Reilly, Addison-Wesley (which is owned by Pearson, which handles the MySQL Press imprint), and Apress. O’Reilly and Apress solicited authors.

Corrections always welcome, and special thanks to Mike Kruckenberg, and Mark Rubin of MySQL AB.

I cannot wait for next month. . .
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
Having used Oracle, DB2, Postgres, Sybase, Informix, and MSSQL, I always enjoyed that MySQL just named everything “MySQL”. Sure, it can get confusing — there’s MySQL the server, MySQL the client, MySQL the database instance. . . .MySQL the flamethrower (the kids love this one). . . .But seriously, the ‘big guys’ have all this complicated jargon for really simple ideas.

MySQL has joined them. Granted, I’d been out of the MySQL world for about a year, and some wonderful things have happened in that year. Even a year ago, the company I worked for wasn’t using the most recent software nor taking advantage of all the features their versions of MySQL did have to offer. But I digress.

I’ve been working on MySQL knowledge, particularly with the free webinars. Today I attended the “MySQL Network and MySQL 5.0” webinar, where I learned that MySQL is packaging (better) software, support, tools, access to developers, and a knowledgebase into what they call “MySQL Network.” I was completely unclear on the concept of MySQL Network from the description, and from the name I figured it would have something to do with technical networking, not business to business networking.

Meanwhile, yesterday I realized that the “Pluggable Storage Engines” in MySQL just mean “you can use different table types, and turn off the ones you don’t want to use.” I was familiar with the concept, but not the buzz-phrase used to describe it.
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
Having used Oracle, DB2, Postgres, Sybase, Informix, and MSSQL, I always enjoyed that MySQL just named everything “MySQL”. Sure, it can get confusing — there’s MySQL the server, MySQL the client, MySQL the database instance. . . .MySQL the flamethrower (the kids love this one). . . .But seriously, the ‘big guys’ have all this complicated jargon for really simple ideas.

MySQL has joined them. Granted, I’d been out of the MySQL world for about a year, and some wonderful things have happened in that year. Even a year ago, the company I worked for wasn’t using the most recent software nor taking advantage of all the features their versions of MySQL did have to offer. But I digress.

I’ve been working on MySQL knowledge, particularly with the free webinars. Today I attended the “MySQL Network and MySQL 5.0” webinar, where I learned that MySQL is packaging (better) software, support, tools, access to developers, and a knowledgebase into what they call “MySQL Network.” I was completely unclear on the concept of MySQL Network from the description, and from the name I figured it would have something to do with technical networking, not business to business networking.

Meanwhile, yesterday I realized that the “Pluggable Storage Engines” in MySQL just mean “you can use different table types, and turn off the ones you don’t want to use.” I was familiar with the concept, but not the buzz-phrase used to describe it.
The first Boston MySQL User Group meeting went swimmingly. About 1/2 the people who RSVP’s yes or maybe showed up, ) got pizza as a thank-you gift.

My boss offered me a ride home, definitely — I’ll just go into work later, and not be tempted by a ride home.

The demographics of the group was really amazing:

about 15% female
those with no experience with any database
those with experience with databases but not MySQL
those who’ve been using MySQL for weeks
those who’ve been using MySQL for months
those who’ve been using MySQL for years
those who are trying to convince their company to switch
about 10% Indian
about 20% other-Asian
(I didn’t notice anyone that was recognizably Hispanic or black)
job titles ranging from developer, dba, all the way up to the vice president and president level
The publishing sector was represented by O’Reilly, Addison-Wesley (which is owned by Pearson, which handles the MySQL Press imprint), and Apress. O’Reilly and Apress solicited authors.

Corrections always welcome, and special thanks to Mike Kruckenberg, and Mark Rubin of MySQL AB.

I cannot wait for next month. . .
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
Having used Oracle, DB2, Postgres, Sybase, Informix, and MSSQL, I always enjoyed that MySQL just named everything “MySQL”. Sure, it can get confusing — there’s MySQL the server, MySQL the client, MySQL the database instance. . . .MySQL the flamethrower (the kids love this one). . . .But seriously, the ‘big guys’ have all this complicated jargon for really simple ideas.

MySQL has joined them. Granted, I’d been out of the MySQL world for about a year, and some wonderful things have happened in that year. Even a year ago, the company I worked for wasn’t using the most recent software nor taking advantage of all the features their versions of MySQL did have to offer. But I digress.

I’ve been working on MySQL knowledge, particularly with the free webinars. Today I attended the “MySQL Network and MySQL 5.0” webinar, where I learned that MySQL is packaging (better) software, support, tools, access to developers, and a knowledgebase into what they call “MySQL Network.” I was completely unclear on the concept of MySQL Network from the description, and from the name I figured it would have something to do with technical networking, not business to business networking.

Meanwhile, yesterday I realized that the “Pluggable Storage Engines” in MySQL just mean “you can use different table types, and turn off the ones you don’t want to use.” I was familiar with the concept, but not the buzz-phrase used to describe it.
The first Boston MySQL User Group meeting went swimmingly. About 1/2 the people who RSVP’s yes or maybe showed up, ) got pizza as a thank-you gift.

My boss offered me a ride home, definitely — I’ll just go into work later, and not be tempted by a ride home.

The demographics of the group was really amazing:

about 15% female
those with no experience with any database
those with experience with databases but not MySQL
those who’ve been using MySQL for weeks
those who’ve been using MySQL for months
those who’ve been using MySQL for years
those who are trying to convince their company to switch
about 10% Indian
about 20% other-Asian
(I didn’t notice anyone that was recognizably Hispanic or black)
job titles ranging from developer, dba, all the way up to the vice president and president level
The publishing sector was represented by O’Reilly, Addison-Wesley (which is owned by Pearson, which handles the MySQL Press imprint), and Apress. O’Reilly and Apress solicited authors.

Corrections always welcome, and special thanks to Mike Kruckenberg, and Mark Rubin of MySQL AB.

I cannot wait for next month. . .
So I’ve been looking into the Archive Storage Engine. What I would really like to do with it is get data in realtime, they want all the data up until “now”.

It is inadvisable to replicate from one storage engine type to another. I have not yet played with it, but since an Archive table does not allow updates and deletes, replicating from a MyISAM or InnoDB table to an Archive one is a bad idea.

Most folks probably run a batch job; but I wonder if it can be done in real-time. Or rather, ‘what is the best way to run it real-time?’ One way, off the top of my head, is to do this are to replicate to a blackhole table with a trigger, to insert into an archive table whenever an INSERT statement is called. The blackhole table should not give an error upon UPDATE or DELETE statements.

This also allows for easy aggregation, because the trigger can say “update the count and the country of a new profile” instead of having an entire replicated set of data, with reports running “SELECT count(*)”. Instead of copying all the data and running the same reports on a different server/table, we can now collect the data we actually want, which is “1 new paid membership at time t located in Sao Paulo, Brazil.” For reporting, we do not care what the name of the member is.

I have searched around but have not yet found how users are getting data into their archived databases. I need a sandbox server at work so I can play with the options.
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
Having used Oracle, DB2, Postgres, Sybase, Informix, and MSSQL, I always enjoyed that MySQL just named everything “MySQL”. Sure, it can get confusing — there’s MySQL the server, MySQL the client, MySQL the database instance. . . .MySQL the flamethrower (the kids love this one). . . .But seriously, the ‘big guys’ have all this complicated jargon for really simple ideas.

MySQL has joined them. Granted, I’d been out of the MySQL world for about a year, and some wonderful things have happened in that year. Even a year ago, the company I worked for wasn’t using the most recent software nor taking advantage of all the features their versions of MySQL did have to offer. But I digress.

I’ve been working on MySQL knowledge, particularly with the free webinars. Today I attended the “MySQL Network and MySQL 5.0” webinar, where I learned that MySQL is packaging (better) software, support, tools, access to developers, and a knowledgebase into what they call “MySQL Network.” I was completely unclear on the concept of MySQL Network from the description, and from the name I figured it would have something to do with technical networking, not business to business networking.

Meanwhile, yesterday I realized that the “Pluggable Storage Engines” in MySQL just mean “you can use different table types, and turn off the ones you don’t want to use.” I was familiar with the concept, but not the buzz-phrase used to describe it.
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
Having used Oracle, DB2, Postgres, Sybase, Informix, and MSSQL, I always enjoyed that MySQL just named everything “MySQL”. Sure, it can get confusing — there’s MySQL the server, MySQL the client, MySQL the database instance. . . .MySQL the flamethrower (the kids love this one). . . .But seriously, the ‘big guys’ have all this complicated jargon for really simple ideas.

MySQL has joined them. Granted, I’d been out of the MySQL world for about a year, and some wonderful things have happened in that year. Even a year ago, the company I worked for wasn’t using the most recent software nor taking advantage of all the features their versions of MySQL did have to offer. But I digress.

I’ve been working on MySQL knowledge, particularly with the free webinars. Today I attended the “MySQL Network and MySQL 5.0” webinar, where I learned that MySQL is packaging (better) software, support, tools, access to developers, and a knowledgebase into what they call “MySQL Network.” I was completely unclear on the concept of MySQL Network from the description, and from the name I figured it would have something to do with technical networking, not business to business networking.

Meanwhile, yesterday I realized that the “Pluggable Storage Engines” in MySQL just mean “you can use different table types, and turn off the ones you don’t want to use.” I was familiar with the concept, but not the buzz-phrase used to describe it.
The first Boston MySQL User Group meeting went swimmingly. About 1/2 the people who RSVP’s yes or maybe showed up, ) got pizza as a thank-you gift.

My boss offered me a ride home, definitely — I’ll just go into work later, and not be tempted by a ride home.

The demographics of the group was really amazing:

about 15% female
those with no experience with any database
those with experience with databases but not MySQL
those who’ve been using MySQL for weeks
those who’ve been using MySQL for months
those who’ve been using MySQL for years
those who are trying to convince their company to switch
about 10% Indian
about 20% other-Asian
(I didn’t notice anyone that was recognizably Hispanic or black)
job titles ranging from developer, dba, all the way up to the vice president and president level
The publishing sector was represented by O’Reilly, Addison-Wesley (which is owned by Pearson, which handles the MySQL Press imprint), and Apress. O’Reilly and Apress solicited authors.

Corrections always welcome, and special thanks to Mike Kruckenberg, and Mark Rubin of MySQL AB.

I cannot wait for next month. . .
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
Having used Oracle, DB2, Postgres, Sybase, Informix, and MSSQL, I always enjoyed that MySQL just named everything “MySQL”. Sure, it can get confusing — there’s MySQL the server, MySQL the client, MySQL the database instance. . . .MySQL the flamethrower (the kids love this one). . . .But seriously, the ‘big guys’ have all this complicated jargon for really simple ideas.

MySQL has joined them. Granted, I’d been out of the MySQL world for about a year, and some wonderful things have happened in that year. Even a year ago, the company I worked for wasn’t using the most recent software nor taking advantage of all the features their versions of MySQL did have to offer. But I digress.

I’ve been working on MySQL knowledge, particularly with the free webinars. Today I attended the “MySQL Network and MySQL 5.0” webinar, where I learned that MySQL is packaging (better) software, support, tools, access to developers, and a knowledgebase into what they call “MySQL Network.” I was completely unclear on the concept of MySQL Network from the description, and from the name I figured it would have something to do with technical networking, not business to business networking.

Meanwhile, yesterday I realized that the “Pluggable Storage Engines” in MySQL just mean “you can use different table types, and turn off the ones you don’t want to use.” I was familiar with the concept, but not the buzz-phrase used to describe it.
The first Boston MySQL User Group meeting went swimmingly. About 1/2 the people who RSVP’s yes or maybe showed up, ) got pizza as a thank-you gift.

My boss offered me a ride home, definitely — I’ll just go into work later, and not be tempted by a ride home.

The demographics of the group was really amazing:

about 15% female
those with no experience with any database
those with experience with databases but not MySQL
those who’ve been using MySQL for weeks
those who’ve been using MySQL for months
those who’ve been using MySQL for years
those who are trying to convince their company to switch
about 10% Indian
about 20% other-Asian
(I didn’t notice anyone that was recognizably Hispanic or black)
job titles ranging from developer, dba, all the way up to the vice president and president level
The publishing sector was represented by O’Reilly, Addison-Wesley (which is owned by Pearson, which handles the MySQL Press imprint), and Apress. O’Reilly and Apress solicited authors.

Corrections always welcome, and special thanks to Mike Kruckenberg, and Mark Rubin of MySQL AB.

I cannot wait for next month. . .
So I’ve been looking into the Archive Storage Engine. What I would really like to do with it is get data in realtime, they want all the data up until “now”.

It is inadvisable to replicate from one storage engine type to another. I have not yet played with it, but since an Archive table does not allow updates and deletes, replicating from a MyISAM or InnoDB table to an Archive one is a bad idea.

Most folks probably run a batch job; but I wonder if it can be done in real-time. Or rather, ‘what is the best way to run it real-time?’ One way, off the top of my head, is to do this are to replicate to a blackhole table with a trigger, to insert into an archive table whenever an INSERT statement is called. The blackhole table should not give an error upon UPDATE or DELETE statements.

This also allows for easy aggregation, because the trigger can say “update the count and the country of a new profile” instead of having an entire replicated set of data, with reports running “SELECT count(*)”. Instead of copying all the data and running the same reports on a different server/table, we can now collect the data we actually want, which is “1 new paid membership at time t located in Sao Paulo, Brazil.” For reporting, we do not care what the name of the member is.

I have searched around but have not yet found how users are getting data into their archived databases. I need a sandbox server at work so I can play with the options.
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
Having used Oracle, DB2, Postgres, Sybase, Informix, and MSSQL, I always enjoyed that MySQL just named everything “MySQL”. Sure, it can get confusing — there’s MySQL the server, MySQL the client, MySQL the database instance. . . .MySQL the flamethrower (the kids love this one). . . .But seriously, the ‘big guys’ have all this complicated jargon for really simple ideas.

MySQL has joined them. Granted, I’d been out of the MySQL world for about a year, and some wonderful things have happened in that year. Even a year ago, the company I worked for wasn’t using the most recent software nor taking advantage of all the features their versions of MySQL did have to offer. But I digress.

I’ve been working on MySQL knowledge, particularly with the free webinars. Today I attended the “MySQL Network and MySQL 5.0” webinar, where I learned that MySQL is packaging (better) software, support, tools, access to developers, and a knowledgebase into what they call “MySQL Network.” I was completely unclear on the concept of MySQL Network from the description, and from the name I figured it would have something to do with technical networking, not business to business networking.

Meanwhile, yesterday I realized that the “Pluggable Storage Engines” in MySQL just mean “you can use different table types, and turn off the ones you don’t want to use.” I was familiar with the concept, but not the buzz-phrase used to describe it.
The first Boston MySQL User Group meeting went swimmingly. About 1/2 the people who RSVP’s yes or maybe showed up, ) got pizza as a thank-you gift.

My boss offered me a ride home, definitely — I’ll just go into work later, and not be tempted by a ride home.

The demographics of the group was really amazing:

about 15% female
those with no experience with any database
those with experience with databases but not MySQL
those who’ve been using MySQL for weeks
those who’ve been using MySQL for months
those who’ve been using MySQL for years
those who are trying to convince their company to switch
about 10% Indian
about 20% other-Asian
(I didn’t notice anyone that was recognizably Hispanic or black)
job titles ranging from developer, dba, all the way up to the vice president and president level
The publishing sector was represented by O’Reilly, Addison-Wesley (which is owned by Pearson, which handles the MySQL Press imprint), and Apress. O’Reilly and Apress solicited authors.

Corrections always welcome, and special thanks to Mike Kruckenberg, and Mark Rubin of MySQL AB.

I cannot wait for next month. . .
So I’ve been looking into the Archive Storage Engine. What I would really like to do with it is get data in realtime, they want all the data up until “now”.

It is inadvisable to replicate from one storage engine type to another. I have not yet played with it, but since an Archive table does not allow updates and deletes, replicating from a MyISAM or InnoDB table to an Archive one is a bad idea.

Most folks probably run a batch job; but I wonder if it can be done in real-time. Or rather, ‘what is the best way to run it real-time?’ One way, off the top of my head, is to do this are to replicate to a blackhole table with a trigger, to insert into an archive table whenever an INSERT statement is called. The blackhole table should not give an error upon UPDATE or DELETE statements.

This also allows for easy aggregation, because the trigger can say “update the count and the country of a new profile” instead of having an entire replicated set of data, with reports running “SELECT count(*)”. Instead of copying all the data and running the same reports on a different server/table, we can now collect the data we actually want, which is “1 new paid membership at time t located in Sao Paulo, Brazil.” For reporting, we do not care what the name of the member is.

I have searched around but have not yet found how users are getting data into their archived databases. I need a sandbox server at work so I can play with the options.
Why is it that running a monitoring system is such a marketable skill? In every company, having servers up is important. So does everyone have a robust monitoring system? Sure, folks implement scripts, but those are always one-off solutions. And what IS it with folks writing scripts that e-mail them when they’re successful? Just touch a file and have a simple script check to see if the file was touched, that way you know when it failed and do not have to rely on “did I get that e-mail?”

I was lucky to have worked on Nagios while at Tufts, and have set it up everywhere else I’ve worked. I should definitely remember to check up on the plugins site from time to time, so I do not duplicate efforts. Of course, submitting plugins would also eliminate the problem of “I wrote that check at my last company, and now I want it again!” I have not yet come across that, although I did come across a plugin I could have used at my last job, checking data via snmp, that would have been useful, and which I will implement here.

For now, nagios (2.0) is happy. I’ve written checks to find the lag time on replication and the remaining innodb space. Behind the cut is a 50k picture of the nagios server, currently happy.

I also intend to use the reporting feature of nagios to get stats on how available our services are.

Continue reading “Does it get any better than this?”

Archive Storage Engine and Reporting

So I’ve been looking into the Archive Storage Engine. What I would really like to do with it is get data in realtime, because (of course) the higher-ups want reports on realtime data — that is, they are not satisfied with a report that is run regularly, they want all the data up until “now”.

It is inadvisable to replicate from one storage engine type to another. I have not yet played with it, but since an Archive table does not allow updates and deletes, replicating from a MyISAM or InnoDB table to an Archive one is a bad idea.

Most folks probably run a batch job; but I wonder if it can be done in real-time. Or rather, ‘what is the best way to run it real-time?’ One way, off the top of my head, is to do this are to replicate to a blackhole table with a trigger, to insert into an archive table whenever an INSERT statement is called. The blackhole table should not give an error upon UPDATE or DELETE statements.

This also allows for easy aggregation, because the trigger can say “update the count and the country of a new profile” instead of having an entire replicated set of data, with reports running “SELECT count(*)”. Instead of copying all the data and running the same reports on a different server/table, we can now collect the data we actually want, which is “1 new paid membership at time t located in Sao Paulo, Brazil.” For reporting, we do not care what the name of the member is.

I have searched around but have not yet found how users are getting data into their archived databases. I need a sandbox server at work so I can play with the options.

To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
Having used Oracle, DB2, Postgres, Sybase, Informix, and MSSQL, I always enjoyed that MySQL just named everything “MySQL”. Sure, it can get confusing — there’s MySQL the server, MySQL the client, MySQL the database instance. . . .MySQL the flamethrower (the kids love this one). . . .But seriously, the ‘big guys’ have all this complicated jargon for really simple ideas.

MySQL has joined them. Granted, I’d been out of the MySQL world for about a year, and some wonderful things have happened in that year. Even a year ago, the company I worked for wasn’t using the most recent software nor taking advantage of all the features their versions of MySQL did have to offer. But I digress.

I’ve been working on MySQL knowledge, particularly with the free webinars. Today I attended the “MySQL Network and MySQL 5.0” webinar, where I learned that MySQL is packaging (better) software, support, tools, access to developers, and a knowledgebase into what they call “MySQL Network.” I was completely unclear on the concept of MySQL Network from the description, and from the name I figured it would have something to do with technical networking, not business to business networking.

Meanwhile, yesterday I realized that the “Pluggable Storage Engines” in MySQL just mean “you can use different table types, and turn off the ones you don’t want to use.” I was familiar with the concept, but not the buzz-phrase used to describe it.
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
Having used Oracle, DB2, Postgres, Sybase, Informix, and MSSQL, I always enjoyed that MySQL just named everything “MySQL”. Sure, it can get confusing — there’s MySQL the server, MySQL the client, MySQL the database instance. . . .MySQL the flamethrower (the kids love this one). . . .But seriously, the ‘big guys’ have all this complicated jargon for really simple ideas.

MySQL has joined them. Granted, I’d been out of the MySQL world for about a year, and some wonderful things have happened in that year. Even a year ago, the company I worked for wasn’t using the most recent software nor taking advantage of all the features their versions of MySQL did have to offer. But I digress.

I’ve been working on MySQL knowledge, particularly with the free webinars. Today I attended the “MySQL Network and MySQL 5.0” webinar, where I learned that MySQL is packaging (better) software, support, tools, access to developers, and a knowledgebase into what they call “MySQL Network.” I was completely unclear on the concept of MySQL Network from the description, and from the name I figured it would have something to do with technical networking, not business to business networking.

Meanwhile, yesterday I realized that the “Pluggable Storage Engines” in MySQL just mean “you can use different table types, and turn off the ones you don’t want to use.” I was familiar with the concept, but not the buzz-phrase used to describe it.
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
Having used Oracle, DB2, Postgres, Sybase, Informix, and MSSQL, I always enjoyed that MySQL just named everything “MySQL”. Sure, it can get confusing — there’s MySQL the server, MySQL the client, MySQL the database instance. . . .MySQL the flamethrower (the kids love this one). . . .But seriously, the ‘big guys’ have all this complicated jargon for really simple ideas.

MySQL has joined them. Granted, I’d been out of the MySQL world for about a year, and some wonderful things have happened in that year. Even a year ago, the company I worked for wasn’t using the most recent software nor taking advantage of all the features their versions of MySQL did have to offer. But I digress.

I’ve been working on MySQL knowledge, particularly with the free webinars. Today I attended the “MySQL Network and MySQL 5.0” webinar, where I learned that MySQL is packaging (better) software, support, tools, access to developers, and a knowledgebase into what they call “MySQL Network.” I was completely unclear on the concept of MySQL Network from the description, and from the name I figured it would have something to do with technical networking, not business to business networking.

Meanwhile, yesterday I realized that the “Pluggable Storage Engines” in MySQL just mean “you can use different table types, and turn off the ones you don’t want to use.” I was familiar with the concept, but not the buzz-phrase used to describe it.
The first Boston MySQL User Group meeting went swimmingly. About 1/2 the people who RSVP’s yes or maybe showed up, ) got pizza as a thank-you gift.

My boss offered me a ride home, definitely — I’ll just go into work later, and not be tempted by a ride home.

The demographics of the group was really amazing:

about 15% female
those with no experience with any database
those with experience with databases but not MySQL
those who’ve been using MySQL for weeks
those who’ve been using MySQL for months
those who’ve been using MySQL for years
those who are trying to convince their company to switch
about 10% Indian
about 20% other-Asian
(I didn’t notice anyone that was recognizably Hispanic or black)
job titles ranging from developer, dba, all the way up to the vice president and president level
The publishing sector was represented by O’Reilly, Addison-Wesley (which is owned by Pearson, which handles the MySQL Press imprint), and Apress. O’Reilly and Apress solicited authors.

Corrections always welcome, and special thanks to Mike Kruckenberg, and Mark Rubin of MySQL AB.

I cannot wait for next month. . .
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
Having used Oracle, DB2, Postgres, Sybase, Informix, and MSSQL, I always enjoyed that MySQL just named everything “MySQL”. Sure, it can get confusing — there’s MySQL the server, MySQL the client, MySQL the database instance. . . .MySQL the flamethrower (the kids love this one). . . .But seriously, the ‘big guys’ have all this complicated jargon for really simple ideas.

MySQL has joined them. Granted, I’d been out of the MySQL world for about a year, and some wonderful things have happened in that year. Even a year ago, the company I worked for wasn’t using the most recent software nor taking advantage of all the features their versions of MySQL did have to offer. But I digress.

I’ve been working on MySQL knowledge, particularly with the free webinars. Today I attended the “MySQL Network and MySQL 5.0” webinar, where I learned that MySQL is packaging (better) software, support, tools, access to developers, and a knowledgebase into what they call “MySQL Network.” I was completely unclear on the concept of MySQL Network from the description, and from the name I figured it would have something to do with technical networking, not business to business networking.

Meanwhile, yesterday I realized that the “Pluggable Storage Engines” in MySQL just mean “you can use different table types, and turn off the ones you don’t want to use.” I was familiar with the concept, but not the buzz-phrase used to describe it.
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
Having used Oracle, DB2, Postgres, Sybase, Informix, and MSSQL, I always enjoyed that MySQL just named everything “MySQL”. Sure, it can get confusing — there’s MySQL the server, MySQL the client, MySQL the database instance. . . .MySQL the flamethrower (the kids love this one). . . .But seriously, the ‘big guys’ have all this complicated jargon for really simple ideas.

MySQL has joined them. Granted, I’d been out of the MySQL world for about a year, and some wonderful things have happened in that year. Even a year ago, the company I worked for wasn’t using the most recent software nor taking advantage of all the features their versions of MySQL did have to offer. But I digress.

I’ve been working on MySQL knowledge, particularly with the free webinars. Today I attended the “MySQL Network and MySQL 5.0” webinar, where I learned that MySQL is packaging (better) software, support, tools, access to developers, and a knowledgebase into what they call “MySQL Network.” I was completely unclear on the concept of MySQL Network from the description, and from the name I figured it would have something to do with technical networking, not business to business networking.

Meanwhile, yesterday I realized that the “Pluggable Storage Engines” in MySQL just mean “you can use different table types, and turn off the ones you don’t want to use.” I was familiar with the concept, but not the buzz-phrase used to describe it.
The first Boston MySQL User Group meeting went swimmingly. About 1/2 the people who RSVP’s yes or maybe showed up, ) got pizza as a thank-you gift.

My boss offered me a ride home, definitely — I’ll just go into work later, and not be tempted by a ride home.

The demographics of the group was really amazing:

about 15% female
those with no experience with any database
those with experience with databases but not MySQL
those who’ve been using MySQL for weeks
those who’ve been using MySQL for months
those who’ve been using MySQL for years
those who are trying to convince their company to switch
about 10% Indian
about 20% other-Asian
(I didn’t notice anyone that was recognizably Hispanic or black)
job titles ranging from developer, dba, all the way up to the vice president and president level
The publishing sector was represented by O’Reilly, Addison-Wesley (which is owned by Pearson, which handles the MySQL Press imprint), and Apress. O’Reilly and Apress solicited authors.

Corrections always welcome, and special thanks to Mike Kruckenberg, and Mark Rubin of MySQL AB.

I cannot wait for next month. . .
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
Having used Oracle, DB2, Postgres, Sybase, Informix, and MSSQL, I always enjoyed that MySQL just named everything “MySQL”. Sure, it can get confusing — there’s MySQL the server, MySQL the client, MySQL the database instance. . . .MySQL the flamethrower (the kids love this one). . . .But seriously, the ‘big guys’ have all this complicated jargon for really simple ideas.

MySQL has joined them. Granted, I’d been out of the MySQL world for about a year, and some wonderful things have happened in that year. Even a year ago, the company I worked for wasn’t using the most recent software nor taking advantage of all the features their versions of MySQL did have to offer. But I digress.

I’ve been working on MySQL knowledge, particularly with the free webinars. Today I attended the “MySQL Network and MySQL 5.0” webinar, where I learned that MySQL is packaging (better) software, support, tools, access to developers, and a knowledgebase into what they call “MySQL Network.” I was completely unclear on the concept of MySQL Network from the description, and from the name I figured it would have something to do with technical networking, not business to business networking.

Meanwhile, yesterday I realized that the “Pluggable Storage Engines” in MySQL just mean “you can use different table types, and turn off the ones you don’t want to use.” I was familiar with the concept, but not the buzz-phrase used to describe it.
The first Boston MySQL User Group meeting went swimmingly. About 1/2 the people who RSVP’s yes or maybe showed up, ) got pizza as a thank-you gift.

My boss offered me a ride home, definitely — I’ll just go into work later, and not be tempted by a ride home.

The demographics of the group was really amazing:

about 15% female
those with no experience with any database
those with experience with databases but not MySQL
those who’ve been using MySQL for weeks
those who’ve been using MySQL for months
those who’ve been using MySQL for years
those who are trying to convince their company to switch
about 10% Indian
about 20% other-Asian
(I didn’t notice anyone that was recognizably Hispanic or black)
job titles ranging from developer, dba, all the way up to the vice president and president level
The publishing sector was represented by O’Reilly, Addison-Wesley (which is owned by Pearson, which handles the MySQL Press imprint), and Apress. O’Reilly and Apress solicited authors.

Corrections always welcome, and special thanks to Mike Kruckenberg, and Mark Rubin of MySQL AB.

I cannot wait for next month. . .
So I’ve been looking into the Archive Storage Engine. What I would really like to do with it is get data in realtime, they want all the data up until “now”.

It is inadvisable to replicate from one storage engine type to another. I have not yet played with it, but since an Archive table does not allow updates and deletes, replicating from a MyISAM or InnoDB table to an Archive one is a bad idea.

Most folks probably run a batch job; but I wonder if it can be done in real-time. Or rather, ‘what is the best way to run it real-time?’ One way, off the top of my head, is to do this are to replicate to a blackhole table with a trigger, to insert into an archive table whenever an INSERT statement is called. The blackhole table should not give an error upon UPDATE or DELETE statements.

This also allows for easy aggregation, because the trigger can say “update the count and the country of a new profile” instead of having an entire replicated set of data, with reports running “SELECT count(*)”. Instead of copying all the data and running the same reports on a different server/table, we can now collect the data we actually want, which is “1 new paid membership at time t located in Sao Paulo, Brazil.” For reporting, we do not care what the name of the member is.

I have searched around but have not yet found how users are getting data into their archived databases. I need a sandbox server at work so I can play with the options.

First Boston MySQL User Group Meeting

The first Boston MySQL User Group meeting went swimmingly. About 1/2 the people who RSVP’s yes or maybe showed up, which meant that the fine Optaros folks hosting us (thanx again to Stephen Walli) got pizza as a thank-you gift.

My boss offered me a ride home, otherwise I would have taken Stephen up on his offer to get a beer. Next time, definitely — I’ll just go into work later, and not be tempted by a ride home.

The demographics of the group was really amazing:

about 15% female
those with no experience with any database
those with experience with databases but not MySQL
those who’ve been using MySQL for weeks
those who’ve been using MySQL for months
those who’ve been using MySQL for years
those who are trying to convince their company to switch
about 10% Indian
about 20% other-Asian
(I didn’t notice anyone that was recognizably Hispanic or black)
job titles ranging from developer, dba, all the way up to the vice president and president level
The publishing sector was represented by O’Reilly, Addison-Wesley (which is owned by Pearson, which handles the MySQL Press imprint), and Apress. O’Reilly and Apress solicited authors.

Corrections always welcome, and special thanks to Mike Kruckenberg, and Mark Rubin of MySQL AB.

I cannot wait for next month. . .

To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
Having used Oracle, DB2, Postgres, Sybase, Informix, and MSSQL, I always enjoyed that MySQL just named everything “MySQL”. Sure, it can get confusing — there’s MySQL the server, MySQL the client, MySQL the database instance. . . .MySQL the flamethrower (the kids love this one). . . .But seriously, the ‘big guys’ have all this complicated jargon for really simple ideas.

MySQL has joined them. Granted, I’d been out of the MySQL world for about a year, and some wonderful things have happened in that year. Even a year ago, the company I worked for wasn’t using the most recent software nor taking advantage of all the features their versions of MySQL did have to offer. But I digress.

I’ve been working on MySQL knowledge, particularly with the free webinars. Today I attended the “MySQL Network and MySQL 5.0” webinar, where I learned that MySQL is packaging (better) software, support, tools, access to developers, and a knowledgebase into what they call “MySQL Network.” I was completely unclear on the concept of MySQL Network from the description, and from the name I figured it would have something to do with technical networking, not business to business networking.

Meanwhile, yesterday I realized that the “Pluggable Storage Engines” in MySQL just mean “you can use different table types, and turn off the ones you don’t want to use.” I was familiar with the concept, but not the buzz-phrase used to describe it.
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
Having used Oracle, DB2, Postgres, Sybase, Informix, and MSSQL, I always enjoyed that MySQL just named everything “MySQL”. Sure, it can get confusing — there’s MySQL the server, MySQL the client, MySQL the database instance. . . .MySQL the flamethrower (the kids love this one). . . .But seriously, the ‘big guys’ have all this complicated jargon for really simple ideas.

MySQL has joined them. Granted, I’d been out of the MySQL world for about a year, and some wonderful things have happened in that year. Even a year ago, the company I worked for wasn’t using the most recent software nor taking advantage of all the features their versions of MySQL did have to offer. But I digress.

I’ve been working on MySQL knowledge, particularly with the free webinars. Today I attended the “MySQL Network and MySQL 5.0” webinar, where I learned that MySQL is packaging (better) software, support, tools, access to developers, and a knowledgebase into what they call “MySQL Network.” I was completely unclear on the concept of MySQL Network from the description, and from the name I figured it would have something to do with technical networking, not business to business networking.

Meanwhile, yesterday I realized that the “Pluggable Storage Engines” in MySQL just mean “you can use different table types, and turn off the ones you don’t want to use.” I was familiar with the concept, but not the buzz-phrase used to describe it.
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
Having used Oracle, DB2, Postgres, Sybase, Informix, and MSSQL, I always enjoyed that MySQL just named everything “MySQL”. Sure, it can get confusing — there’s MySQL the server, MySQL the client, MySQL the database instance. . . .MySQL the flamethrower (the kids love this one). . . .But seriously, the ‘big guys’ have all this complicated jargon for really simple ideas.

MySQL has joined them. Granted, I’d been out of the MySQL world for about a year, and some wonderful things have happened in that year. Even a year ago, the company I worked for wasn’t using the most recent software nor taking advantage of all the features their versions of MySQL did have to offer. But I digress.

I’ve been working on MySQL knowledge, particularly with the free webinars. Today I attended the “MySQL Network and MySQL 5.0” webinar, where I learned that MySQL is packaging (better) software, support, tools, access to developers, and a knowledgebase into what they call “MySQL Network.” I was completely unclear on the concept of MySQL Network from the description, and from the name I figured it would have something to do with technical networking, not business to business networking.

Meanwhile, yesterday I realized that the “Pluggable Storage Engines” in MySQL just mean “you can use different table types, and turn off the ones you don’t want to use.” I was familiar with the concept, but not the buzz-phrase used to describe it.
The first Boston MySQL User Group meeting went swimmingly. About 1/2 the people who RSVP’s yes or maybe showed up, ) got pizza as a thank-you gift.

My boss offered me a ride home, definitely — I’ll just go into work later, and not be tempted by a ride home.

The demographics of the group was really amazing:

about 15% female
those with no experience with any database
those with experience with databases but not MySQL
those who’ve been using MySQL for weeks
those who’ve been using MySQL for months
those who’ve been using MySQL for years
those who are trying to convince their company to switch
about 10% Indian
about 20% other-Asian
(I didn’t notice anyone that was recognizably Hispanic or black)
job titles ranging from developer, dba, all the way up to the vice president and president level
The publishing sector was represented by O’Reilly, Addison-Wesley (which is owned by Pearson, which handles the MySQL Press imprint), and Apress. O’Reilly and Apress solicited authors.

Corrections always welcome, and special thanks to Mike Kruckenberg, and Mark Rubin of MySQL AB.

I cannot wait for next month. . .

Jargon

Having used Oracle, DB2, Postgres, Sybase, Informix, and MSSQL, I always enjoyed that MySQL just named everything “MySQL”. Sure, it can get confusing — there’s MySQL the server, MySQL the client, MySQL the database instance. . . .MySQL the flamethrower (the kids love this one). . . .But seriously, the ‘big guys’ have all this complicated jargon for really simple ideas.

MySQL has joined them. Granted, I’d been out of the MySQL world for about a year, and some wonderful things have happened in that year. Even a year ago, the company I worked for wasn’t using the most recent software nor taking advantage of all the features their versions of MySQL did have to offer. But I digress.

I’ve been working on MySQL knowledge, particularly with the free webinars. Today I attended the “MySQL Network and MySQL 5.0” webinar, where I learned that MySQL is packaging (better) software, support, tools, access to developers, and a knowledgebase into what they call “MySQL Network.” I was completely unclear on the concept of MySQL Network from the description, and from the name I figured it would have something to do with technical networking, not business to business networking.

Meanwhile, yesterday I realized that the “Pluggable Storage Engines” in MySQL just mean “you can use different table types, and turn off the ones you don’t want to use.” I was familiar with the concept, but not the buzz-phrase used to describe it.

To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
To contact me via e-mail:

awfief@gmail.com
Having used Oracle, DB2, Postgres, Sybase, Informix, and MSSQL, I always enjoyed that MySQL just named everything “MySQL”. Sure, it can get confusing — there’s MySQL the server, MySQL the client, MySQL the database instance. . . .MySQL the flamethrower (the kids love this one). . . .But seriously, the ‘big guys’ have all this complicated jargon for really simple ideas.

MySQL has joined them. Granted, I’d been out of the MySQL world for about a year, and some wonderful things have happened in that year. Even a year ago, the company I worked for wasn’t using the most recent software nor taking advantage of all the features their versions of MySQL did have to offer. But I digress.

I’ve been working on MySQL knowledge, particularly with the free webinars. Today I attended the “MySQL Network and MySQL 5.0” webinar, where I learned that MySQL is packaging (better) software, support, tools, access to developers, and a knowledgebase into what they call “MySQL Network.” I was completely unclear on the concept of MySQL Network from the description, and from the name I figured it would have something to do with technical networking, not business to business networking.

Meanwhile, yesterday I realized that the “Pluggable Storage Engines” in MySQL just mean “you can use different table types, and turn off the ones you don’t want to use.” I was familiar with the concept, but not the buzz-phrase used to describe it.